Where To Find The Best Literary Hotels

Indulge your creative side and opt for a stay at a hotel that’s inspired famous poets and authors alike…

1 To Snare a Spy: The Nare, Cornwall 

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Critically acclaimed author Jon Stock was inspired by the Roseland Pensinsula in Cornwall and has set his latest spy thriller To Snare A Spy at The Nare, country house hotel.

To celebrate, guests of the hotel visiting this summer who choose the special literary package will find copies of To Snare A Spy in their rooms. They are also invited to relieve the sights and scenes of the books with their own spy espionage adventure. The hotel’s 38ft motor launch, Alice Rose, will be available to explore the Helford river on ‘SOE’ style missions along the un-spoilt waterway full of creeks within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 01872 501 111 to book.

2 Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: Wonderland House, Brighton

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Lewis Carroll used to spend his summers in the seaside resort town of Brighton, and is said to have drawn inspiration from his surroundings. Wonderland House offers unique guests rooms, each containing whimsical furnishings and decorations that reference Alice—there are kettles, clocks, mirrors, and teacups galore.

The Mad Hatter-themed kitchen even comes complete with a black-and-white checkerboard floor and all the fixings for a raucous tea party.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 07950 328093 to book.

3 The Jungle Book: Brown’s Hotel, London

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Rudyard Kipling wrote some of The Jungle Book at Brown’s Hotel, London in 1892 and frequently stayed thereafter, claiming it inspired his creativity.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 020 7493 6020 to book. 

4 James Bond: Dukes Hotel, London

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Ian Fleming was a frequent at the bar of Dukes Hotel. The bar now specialises in martinis, and offers a martini masterclass to craft the perfect “shaken, not stirred” cocktail.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 020 7491 4840 to book.

5 Oscar Wilde: The Cadogan Hotel, London

The arrest of Oscar Wilde: The pet of London society, one of our most successful playwriters and poets, arrested on a horrible charge

Oscar Wilde was a frequent guest at The Cadogan Hotel where it’s claimed sparked some of his novel ideas. Poet laureate John Betjeman commemorated the arrest of Wilde in the hotel, in his poem The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel, and the hotel has renamed the room where the handcuffing went down as the Oscar Wilde Room.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 020 7730 7000 to book.

6 Winnie the Pooh: Ashdown Park, Sussex

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AA Milne’s Hundre Acre Wood (home to Winnie the Pooh) lies amongst the grounds of Ashdown Park, Sussex. You can walk around the estate and discover Pooh Bridge and Roo’s Sandpit.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 01342 824988 to book.

7 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: The Balmoral Hotel, Edinburgh

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J.K. Rowling finished the Harry Potter series in a suite at The Balmoral Hotel, and wrote on a marble bust ‘JK Rowling finished writing Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows in this room (552) on 11th Jan 2007.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 0131 556 2414 to book.

8 The Tale of Peter Rabbit: Linthwaithe Hall, The Lake District

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Having lived in the Lake District for most of her adult life, Beatrix Potter is said to have written parts of The Tale of Peter Rabbit at Linthwaite Hall. The Lakes are also said to have inspired a lot of Potter’s works.

Bring it to life:  Click here or phone 015394 88600 to book.

9 Kaspar, Prince of Cats: The Savoy, London

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During Michael Morpurgo’s residency at The Savoy, he met the hotels house feline, Kaspar, who is said to have inspired Michael Morpurgo’s children’s book, Kaspar, Prince of Cats.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 020 7836 4343 to book.

10 Ulysses: The Shelbourne, Dublin

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Known to many as one of the greatest literary works ever written, James Joyce’s novel ‘Ulysses’ mentions The Shelbourne Dublin, a place that Joyce is thought to have visited during his time in Dublin.

Bring it to life: Click here or phone 353 1 663 4500 to book.

Looking for more travel inspiration? Find it in the latest issue of Good Things

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